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Three stories of art: Maggi, Palmieri, Politi at Lorcan O’Neill Gallery

Painting and sculpture in auge at the Lorcan O’Neill. A triumph of the image, the icon, and the symbolic.

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Painting and sculpture in auge at the Lorcan O’Neill. A triumph of the image, the icon, and the symbolic. Opened December the 24th, ‘Three Romans’ is shown until January the 30th at the Lorcan O’Neill Gallery in Rome: Emiliano Maggi, Marco Palmieri, Gianni Politi.

 

The largest room opens up for a confrontation between Palmieri and Politi, one’s work literally facing the other’s. The challenge between abstract and figurative seems to dominate the room. A limit is being questioned.

 

Even if on a posyt-modern-Mondrian-like ground, Marco Palmieri’s portraits evoke the whole history of figurative art, his classical busts portraits echo ancient Greek art, and his expressive and sharp line echoes Matisse and Picasso drawings. Artistic references are many, and Palmieri appears able to manage them, in a masterly and playful aesthetic.

 

Marco Palmieri, Orlando, 2015, Acrylic on canvas, 160 x 110, courtesy of Lorcan O'Neill gallery.

Marco Palmieri, Orlando, 2015, Acrylic on canvas, 160 x 110, courtesy of Lorcan O’Neill gallery.

 

The large canvases of Gianni Politi are the ground on which abstract forms take shape. Described as landscapes, the paintings are made of scraps of previous works reassembled into new compositions. Hence, Politi’s artistic research crosses though paint, paper, and destroyed canvases. Politi’s symbolical yet cryptical titles reveal the changing nature of perception and open to different interpretations.

 

The right and smaller part of the gallery is completely dedicated to the sculptural and pictorial work of Emiliano Maggi.

 

More executioners than ghosts, the characters of the magic and folkloristic world of Maggi explores ancestral rituals made by spirits and gods, like Artemis (see Ghostdancer #8), in a disquieting and evocative dream. In the dramatic arrangement in which the sculptures are displayed, lights play a fundamental role by illuminating the works in a theatrical way. Staring and scaring, his personages are actors, challenging the material in which they’ve been created in order to be part of the viewer’s reality.

 

Emiliano Maggi, Ghost Family at a Free Festival, 2015, oil on canvas, 140 x 180 cm, courtesy of Lorcan O'Neill gallery.

Emiliano Maggi, Ghost Family at a Free Festival, 2015, oil on canvas, 140 x 180 cm, courtesy of Lorcan O’Neill gallery.

 

Three Romans is a generous attempt to give relevance to the always changing face of contemporary Roman art, an art of stories and histories, memories and characters.

 


Address: 3 Vicolo dei Catinari, Rome 00186, Italy.
Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm

Free entrance

After earning a BA in Art History (with concentration on modern and contemporary art) she realized her deep interest in museum studies while attending the MA in Visual Arts and Curatorial studies in Milan. Her research is focused on the cultural dynamics of museums and public collections and on their capacity of creating critical spirit within different audiences.

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