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Russia on the road 1920-1990

Russia on the Road 1920-1990 is a temporary exhibition shown at Palazzo delle Esposizioni. Until the 15th December you will have the chance to see around 60 paintings and graphic works from several major Russian museums.

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Russia on the Road 1920-1990 is a temporary exhibition shown at Palazzo delle Esposizioni. Until the 15th December 2015 you will have the chance to see around 60 paintings and graphic works from several major Russian museums.

 

There is a thematic approach behind the selection of these works of art: they belong to the Soviet period and they celebrate the development of technology, embodied by transportation. So cars, trains, airplanes, as a symbol of progress and supremacy of man over the Russian expanses and eventually over space, with the first rockets.

 

The exhibition is divided in several rooms of different colors, with soft lights and spotlights pointed on the works. And since they are mostly oil paintings, it is not always easy to find a proper observation point.
Anyways, coherent to the thematic approach, every section introduces a different theme common to the works: “October Revolution”, “Soviet Road Movie”, “Wild Russia”, “The Space Race”, “Love and Machines”.

 

Entrance of the exhibition, courtesy of Palazzo delle Esposizioni

Entrance of the exhibition, courtesy of Palazzo delle Esposizioni

 

The paintings focus on urban and industrial subjects, portrayed consistently to the principles of Revolutionary Realism.
But painters were sometimes influenced by Europe. Even Pimenov in “New Moscow” shows a reference to the Nouvelle Vague, giving us a taste of the freedom granted by cars and letting us enjoy the vibrant everyday life of the city with its new buildings on the broad Tverskaya street.

 

"New Moscow" by Yuri Ivanovich Pimenov, 1937, Oil on canvas, 140 x 170, courtesy of Tetryakov Gallery

“New Moscow” by Yuri Ivanovich Pimenov, 1937, Oil on canvas, 140 x 170,
courtesy of Tetryakov Gallery

 

In spite of the manifest intention of celebrating changes and progress, some of those works talk to us in a different way. It is the case of Nissky‘s paintings, in which the human figures are captured in their defeating loneliness: the train or the airplane, bearers of progress, cannot do anything about it.

 

"En route" by Georgy Grigorievich Nissky, 1958-1964, Oil on canvas, 141 x 154, courtesy of the Institute of Russian Realist Art

“En route” by Georgy Grigorievich Nissky, 1958-1964, Oil on canvas, 141 x 154,
courtesy of the Institute of Russian Realist Art

 

"Over the Snowy Fields" by Georgy Grigorievich Nissky, 1964, Oil on canvas, 87 x 165, courtesy of the Institute of Russian Realist Art

“Over the Snowy Fields” by Georgy Grigorievich Nissky, 1964, Oil on canvas, 87 x 165,
courtesy of the Institute of Russian Realist Art

 

In the section “Love and Machines”, we find pictures of workers, the heroes of Soviet era.
“The shift is over” by Tahir Salakhov is a perfect example of the Soviet representation of workers. It is set in the surreal industrial settlement of Neft Daşları in Baku, Azerbaijan. In this painting, which occupies a whole wall, workers are not just men and women, but majestic gigantic figures, walking against the wind.
From their plastic poses one can perceive their heroism.
They are the actual spine of Soviet power.

 

"The shift is over" by Tahir Salakhov, 1957, 165 x 368, courtesy of The Russian Academy of Fine Arts

“The shift is over” by Tahir Salakhov, 1957, 165 x 368,
courtesy of The Russian Academy of Fine Arts

 


Address: Palazzo delle Esposizioni, 194 via Nazionale – Rome
Opening hours: Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 10AM – 8PM; Friday and Saturday 10AM – 10:30PM; closed on Monday.
Ticket: 12,50 €

 

Francesca Laura is a talented and eclectic writer, she works as a script consultant for a well-known film production house in Italy, while cultivating her passion for literature. She is currently involved in different projects with directors and authors.

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