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Recognize Different Artistic Styles: Correggio and Parmigianino

Instead of the usual Raphael, Leonardo, and the many other artists working in the well-known Florence and Rome, visitors can experience the artistic environment of a lesser known town by displaying the works of its main artists

2 minutes

 

I have always liked exhibitions held at Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome: the rooms are spacious, the path is straight, and the topics interesting. The exhibition Correggio and Parmigianino: Art in Parma in the Cinquecento is not any different. The curator David Ekserdjian has chosen two Renaissance painters from Parma. Instead of the usual Raphael, Leonardo, and the many other artists working in the well-known Florence and Rome, visitors can experience the artistic environment of a lesser known town by displaying the works of its main artists.

The whole exhibition is structured upon a constant confrontation between the two artists to demonstrate similarities, differences, and the improvements of the school of Parma from the end of the 15th to the second half of the 16th century. Accordingly, Antonio Allegri from Correggio, known as Correggio, (1489-1534) was the inspiration of Francesco Mazzola, known as Parmigianino, (1503-1540)  and many other artists working in the second half of 16th century, especially in terms of style. During the exhibition, I ask you to notice some common traits, like the long and elegant bodies and slant-eyed women.

 

Correggio, Noli me tangere, 1525, O/C, Prado, Madrid. Courtesy of the museum

Correggio, Noli Me Tangere, 1525, O/C, Prado, Madrid. Courtesy of the museum. Above: Correggio, The School of Love, 1522, O/C, National Gallery, London. Courtesy of the museum.

 

How could the curator create a clear comparison between the two artists? He simply assigned a topic to each room. With the exception of the first rooms, dedicated to the artists’ origins, and a space for lesser-known artists, each area of the exhibition shares common characteristics: a topic and a wall for each artist. Correggio is always on the right, while Parmigianino is on the left. Through this decision, visitors can understand any differences and similarities regarding religion, portraits, and mythology at the entrance of the room, while looking at works on the opposite walls to the left and right.

 

Parmigianino, Lucretia, 1540, O/C, Museo Capodimonte, Naples. Courtesy

Parmigianino, Lucretia, 1540, O/C, Museo Capodimonte, Naples. Courtesy

 

On the second floor, visitors can appreciate other artists from Parma, such as Michelangelo Anselmi (1491-1556), as well as different artistic media and techniques. The most interesting area is the room dedicated to sketches and drawing, which are delightful.

Do I recommend this exhibition? Of course I do! If you want to get to know different Renaissance painters, this is the perfect exhibit to visit. Moreover, the explanative panels are complete of the needed information (in both Italian and English). The only flaw of the exhibition is a lack of balance between the comparison of the two artists and the Parmisan context. I would have appreciated further explanation on the Court of Parma. However, it is just a detail thought up by a fussy woman.

Go to the exhibition and be prepared: the first room contains a huge surprise!

 


Correggio e Parmigianino. Arte a Parma nel Cinquecento

12 marzo – 26 giugno 2016

Scuderie del Quirinale

Address: Via XXIV Maggio 16, Rome.

Info: http://www.scuderiequirinale.it | Tel. +39 06 39967500 | info.sdq@palaexpo.it

Hours: Sunday to Thursday 10:00am – 8:00pmFriday and Saturday 10:00am – 10:30pmlast admission one hour before closing time.

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